Introducing Generations Gewürztraminer

It’s been described as complex, soapy and generally over the top, however Allan Scott’s take on the often misunderstood Gewürztraminer is set to change perceptions and prove that New Zealand-produced Gewürz is a wine of top international quality. The newest member of the exclusive Generations range, Allan Scott Family  Winemakers’ latest release Gewürztraminer has a delicate and opulent level of acidity to match its sheer weight and size, and is a refreshing alternative to the usual go-to whites.


The ultimate match for spicy Asian food (it can handle the heat!), this iteration can also be enjoyed with the exotic flavours of Vietnamese dumplings and sweet Middle Eastern delicacies such as Baklava or rice pudding thanks to its softer and more delicate finish on the nose – allowing its 
gorgeous candied fig and lightly dusted Turkish delight flavours to shine through.  Lead winemaker, Josh Scott, notes the Generations Gewürz (or ‘G’whizz’ as the Scott family fondly refer to it) is just as enjoyable on its own without food. “The lychee and tickly spice flavours are well balanced in the wine, allowing it to sit neatly on the palate. “While some Gewürz can be overly perfumed and difficult to enjoy on their own – ours, by contrast, is really delicate, without too much overpowering lychee or pungency. We take our time nurturing the vine to ensure we produce the very best fruit to be picked at the right time – in the dead of the night.” The exclusive Generations series launched last year and sold out in record time, highlighting Allan Scott Family Winemakers’ commitment to making (and Kiwis’ passion for drinking) high-quality wine.


These varietals are single-vineyard sourced and created from the best grapes produced on the Scott’s estate. Due to the family’s exacting standards and the result of low-yield vines, meticulous viticulture and special attention in the cellar, these wines are only produced in limited quantities. The Generations series is also known for its playful branding – a nod to the Scott’s family roots, with hand illustrated labels eloquently and cleverly portraying those commonly found objects at the winery, such as a cork screw or well-worn shovel. Each illustration is then mirrored with another in a child’s render, referencing the handing down of skills between generations. The Gewürztraminer label follows suit with illustrations of man’s best friend, the trusted canine companion. The Generations series not only symbolises the generation shift for Allan Scott Family Winemakers (with patriarch Allan passing the reins of the business onto his children – Victoria, Sara and Josh) but is also a reflection of the importance the Scott’s place on ensuring the business is around for years to come. “We think it is really important to leave the land how we found it, we don’t want to just be environmentally sustainable – we want to create a strong foundation for the future. “Josh is always looking for more ways to lessen our impact on the environment. His next mission is for solar power at the winery!” says Allan Scott. 
The first drop of Allan Scott Generations Gewürztraminer is on sale now online, at the cellar door and from fine wine retailers across the country.

Check out an interview below with Allan about the launch. Credit @mermaidmary

Understanding the clones in the Pinot Project

Unsure about the term ‘clones’ in the new Pinot Project?

Don’t worry you’re not alone!  In this world first case, the clones are quite simply three varieties of Pinot Noir grapes that, by expressing individual characteristics, provide unique flavour profiles to make their own distinctive taste. Click on the images of the grapes below to learn about each flavour profile.

Each clone is so different in terms of flavour and texture so it’s important to taste all three clones (as well as the Scott Base Reserve) by itself first. From hints of chocolate and leather to rich, ripe red fruit – each bottle brings something very different to the table.

Once you’ve tasted each wine individually it’s time to start blending! It’s important to have fun with it and experiment, but we suggest starting with a small amount of each clone (using a standard measure to ensure you can track your ratios) and build up from there. Don’t forget to taste as you go!

The best way to enjoy the Pinot Project is with a group of friends or even better organise a staff bonding exercise for your colleagues. Let your team to try their hand at the delicate art of wine blending and play off each other for the best blend. Make an evening out of it and cook up the matching dishes created by Twelve Trees Vineyard Restaurant Head Chef Lawrence Purser to share with your group.

Click here to order yours now.

The Pinot Project: how will you blend yours?

For anyone who thinks they have the midas touch required to become one of only 230 master sommeliers worldwide, the Scott Base ‘Pinot Project’ provides all the ingredients to finesse the vintner’s craft.

Applicable for both wine buffs and novices alike, the team from Allan Scott Family Winemakers is providing pinot-loving Kiwis with the unique opportunity to try their hand at the delicate art of wine blending, all from the comfort of their own home.

The premium selection of wines from its Central Otago Scott Base vineyard make up the ultra-exclusive Pinot Project case, with each case housing three ‘clones’ (slight variations of the Pinot Noir grape that provide different nuances, structures and flavours) which the winemaking team, led by Josh Scott, have used to create the very unique Scott Base Reserve Pinot Noir (the fourth bottle in the case).

The ultra-exclusive Pinot Project concept is a first for New Zealand, and with only 400 cases available at $150 a pop, is designed to challenge and inspire self-proclaimed wine connoisseurs across the country to put their skills and tastebuds to the test.

“Much like a painter uses a variety of colours and textures to create a masterpiece, we use a variety of clones to develop the perfect Pinot Noir – and now we want others to have a go at the blending process,” says Josh.

“We know Kiwis are partial to a Central Otago Pinot Noir, so we thought it fitting to create the opportunity to develop their own unique drop. Grab your friends, throw on some tunes and get the cheese board out then let the blending begin – see if you can do better than the professionals by combining the four clones to make your own world class artisan Central Otago Pinot Noir.

According to Josh, those taking on the Pinot Project can expect to experience a number of different flavours and aromas from dark berry fruit (think plums, cherries and blackberries) to gorgeous spices including pepper, clove and thyme.

Those looking to enjoy their unique blend alongside the perfect meal can also head to online to download and recreate exclusive recipes from Twelve Trees Head Chef Lawrence Purser which have been designed to match the Scott Base Reserve Pinot Noir and bring the blend’s deep flavours to life.

 

About the Pinot Project clones

 

Scott Base Clone 10/5

This was the first clone to come to NZ in the 60s and was widely planted by the first Pinot Noir producers. It originates from Burgundy, France and although a lot of early producers used it for the production of Methode Traditionnelle, with age and good crop management it produces some outstanding still wines. This clone is extremely rich in ripe red fruit – it has a depth of flavour that gives a lingering complexity on the palate and enough oak to integrate with the fruit.

Scott Base Clone 777

This is one of the newer “sexier” Dijon clones from France, and is popular with winemakers around New Zealand. It is specifically selected for its smaller crops, tight bunches and lovely fruit characters. It features large black fruit and also a herbal character with hints of chocolate and leather, alongside tighter tannins.

Scott Base Clone 5

This Clone comes from the famous Pommard region in France. It was isolated by UC Davis University of California and was widely planted around the world in the 1970s. This clone shows big rich primary red fruit and lots of dark cherry. It retains its acidity, has a good amount of French oak and finishes with some tight tannins.

Scott Base Reserve

The Scott Base Reserve recently won an ‘Elite Gold’ medal at the Air NZ Wine Awards, and is a blend of the above three wines. The Scott Base Central Otago Reserve is a lot fuller bodied in flavour with aromas of berry fruit and black cherries, wild thyme and toasty oak layered with savoury spice. It is a medium-bodied wine that is rich and luscious, with supple tannins, balanced acidity and a long finish. Quite simply: the best of the best.

About Scott Base vineyard

Owned by Allan Scott Family Winemakers, Scott Base vineyard is situated in one of the most beautiful regions of New Zealand, overlooking the quaint township of Cromwell and Lake Dunstan, with the majestic Pisa Range acting as a spectacular backdrop.

To celebrate and pay tribute to the link between Scott Base in Antarctica and Scott Base vineyard, the Scott family formed a partnership with the Antarctic Heritage Trust which is entrusted to preserve the buildings and heritage status of Antarctica. The family donate a percentage of sales of Scott Base wines to the trust and provide wines for events and ongoing activities.

 

Chefs On Tour 2017

Following the success of the inaugural event in 2016, in which we raised almost $20,000 for KidsCan, we have teamed up with Cloudy Bay Clams to do it all again for this wonderful charity.

On Friday 10 February (the night before the Marlborough Wine & Food Festival) the Allan Scott Courtyard and Gardens will be buzzing with celebrity Chefs, amazing street food, brilliant entertainment, and let’s not forget the delicious Allan Scott Wines!!

Tickets just $185 per person, and can be purchased from Allan Scott Wines – phone 03 5729054 or email kylie@allanscott.co.nz

Marlborough Man

A quintessentially kiwi story of an accidental wine industry trail blazer

The true story of our local icon, Allan, is now for sale in retailers. From the planting of the first vines to the global success of New Zealand’s billion-dollar Sauvignon Blanc industry, Allan tells of his experience in the Marlborough wine industry.

Don’t miss out on getting your copy in time for Christmas for your favourite wine lover.

Available here

Woolshed Tour – with Mel Parsons and The Bitches

Allan Scott Family Winemakers are very proud sponsors of Mel Parsons & The Bitches Box.  The sequel – Mel Parsons & Sons of A Bitch, hit rural New Zealand earlier in the year, converting woolsheds into concert halls, and serving Allan Scott Wine!  Check out the tour vid here:

A Pink and Sparkling Addition to Mother’s Day

IMG_20160228_202501

Sparkling wines the world over have been named after female family members or veuves who ran well-established wineries.

Following suit, the Allan Scott Family Winemakers (ASFW) Cecilia Rosé Méthode Traditionnelle Marlborough Brut NV playfully and lovingly nods to an exceptional member of the Scott family, Catherine Cecilia Scott, who alongside husband Allan planted the first of the family owned vineyards in Marlborough in 1975.

A subtle blush colour with warm hints of gold, son and head winemaker Josh Scott (with tongue firmly in cheek) reveals both the namesake and the Cecilia Rosé Méthode Traditionnelle Brut NV boast complex and elegant characters.

Vinted from a blend of chardonnay and pinot noir, the sparkling wine is a true Méthode Traditionnelle style aged on lees and fitting for festivity. Dry yet crisp and refreshing, it has flavours of wild summer fruits such as ripe strawberries and raspberries with bubbles that enhance the aromas on the palate.

Josh knows better than to comment on his mother’s traits, instead highlighting that the three children (himself and his two sisters Victoria and Sara) now tasked with leading operations at the winery have forever credited the drop as the instigator of good times.

“Cecilia Rosé definitely has a place in our hearts that will always be connected to moments where we are able to gather as a family. It’s the bottle that has been present at family weddings, birthdays and anniversaries – and of course it would be rude not to get involved for Mother’s Day too,” says Josh.

Gifting a bottle of Cecilia Rosé will definitely have your mum feeling the love, but why not go the extra mile and serve alongside a home cooked meal? This wine would pair beautifully with a fresh Marlborough salmon risotto and a decadent berry dessert.

LEADING THE REVOLUTION IN RIESLING

riesling

Introducing the Gold medal-winning Allan Scott Family Winemakers Marlborough Riesling 2014.

Move over Sauvignon, Marlborough has another wine varietal making waves in the white wine category.

Stepping up to the winner’s plate at the recent 2015 Air New Zealand Wine Awards with two gold medals, Allan Scott Family Winemakers (ASFW) is proving that everything happens for a Riesling.

Gold in colour with a balance of citrus and spicy floral characteristics that resonate on the palate, the Allan Scott Family Winemakers Marlborough Riesling 2014 is the perfect accompaniment to contrasting savoury or spicy dishes, hard cheeses or even on its own.

The grapes, harvested from the site’s “Moorlands” block which directly surrounds the winery, contain some of the oldest Riesling vines in Marlborough and were the first variety planted by Allan and his wife Catherine upon establishing the vineyard. Due to the vines maturity (over 30 years in age) this vineyard consistently produces quality fruit year after year.

Head winemaker Josh Scott believes New Zealand Riesling, or as he fondly calls it ‘terrace wine’, is now having its moment in the sun.

“Rieslings can be a hard sell with many people thinking that their German heritage make them overly sweet. We’re seeing quite the opposite here in Marlborough with our aromatic wines increasingly becoming more dry as the vines age,” Scott says.

“These older vines’ grapes tend to sit well with the local palette, producing wines you can find yourself quite easily sipping away while sitting in the sun – why wouldn’t that be appealing?”

The Allan Scott Family Winemakers Marlborough Riesling 2014 is harvested in the coolness of the early morning and fermented in steel tanks while being tasted until it reaches its optimum residual sugar level and fermentation is stopped. The varietal is available at most leading supermarkets and selected liquor outlets.

Mixing Grape and Grain in Marlborough

Becoming a Cicerone is a lot of work, but Josh Scott is up to the challenge. Josh Scott talks beer snobs, supermarket wine, and reaching “peak hop”.

By Don Kavanagh – wine-searcher.com

josh-scott-moa-beer-10005371

 

If you need something done, ask a busy person, they say. If that’s the case, feel free to pass on any important tasks to New Zealander Josh Scott.

The son of well-known Marlborough wine figure Allan Scott, Josh not only looks after the winemaking for the family winery but he is also the founder and brewer of Moa Beers, one of the biggest craft breweries in New Zealand.

He is also one of 200 Certified Cicerones around the world, a beer qualification similar to wine and sommelier education courses. Add in a couple of kids and a fondness for multisport events and it’s a wonder he has any time at all to stop and chat to Wine-Searcher.

He is happy to talk, of course. Moa has just released its latest beer, a Belgian-style IPA in the company’s Festive series, and Scott is keen to talk up the brewing side of his life.

Founded in his father’s winery in 2003, Moa hasn’t always had the easiest of rides. A public float was followed by a dismal share-price drop and the company has also attracted criticism from craft beer aficionados who don’t think it is ideologically pure enough.

Scott, however, is bullish.

“Sales are phenomenal; we’re exporting to the U.S., U.K., Australia and Asia, and Brazil really likes our beer, too. I think we worked out that, every five seconds, someone around the world is drinking a Moa beer. We’re easily the fourth-biggest brewery in New Zealand, we brew a million liters of our special reserve beers and then there is the core range as well.”

He admitted that the company had learned some valuable lessons from the aftermath of its public float, but said it was something they were getting over. The more snobby end of the craft beer spectrum’s disdain for his beers – seemingly based on the perception that a successful brewer is somehow suspect – is something you feel hurts him more than any financial blow.

moa-brewing-company-10005372

Moa is one of New Zealand’s largest craft brewers, but has taken some heat.

“Are we pioneers? I think so. When I was selling my first beers 12 years ago, there were no craft beers on the supermarket shelves, now there are plenty. We were there before there were craft beer nerds! We’ve had some criticism and I think it has been unjustified – size has nothing to do with craft beer. If you go to the U.S. there are breweries there that make huge quantities of beer, but they are still considered craft beers. The craft beer snobs remind of the wine snobs of a few years ago – over-pretentious people who thought they knew best. Wine snobs had suits, craft beer snobs have beards. I’m a bit of a beer nerd myself, but I think I’m allowed to be.”

Some of the suspicion of Moa could also be down to the more sensible approach to the use of hops that Scott and fellow brewer David Nicholls have taken. The Hop-ocalypse approach of cramming in as many IBUs as possible is not for them.

“In the US, it’s just nuts; it’s like an arms race with people trying to pack in more and more hop flavors. I can’t believe how hoppy beer has become in the past five years, but balance is the key – the hop hit is fine, but you need some malt and alcohol to back it up. You can’t make a lower-alcohol beer, for example, and pack in so much hop flavor; the beer just won’t support it. I hope we do reach peak hop soon, though, because it’s getting a bit silly.”

The brewing game is close to his heart, naturally, but the winemaking is genetic. His father started the winery and Scott Jr and his two sisters were involved early. Scott started making his own wine aged 12 and was trying to market his own label at the age of 15.

“Winemaking and brewing are about 50/50 at the moment. There’s been a bit of a generational change at the winery with Mum and Dad moving out. It’s busy at the winery; we’re trying to strip things back to a pure quality focus. I know everyone says that, but it’s true. I’m sick of seeing our wines on the supermarket shelf for $15, I know they are better than that.

“You get fly-by-night supermarket brands, based outside of Marlborough, buying grapes cheap and cranking out a Sauvignon Blanc for the supermarkets. Two vintages later the brand has disappeared. That forces down everyone’s prices and there’s just no margin in it for the winery. After all a winery is a business and needs that margin to survive.”

As the old saw goes, the best way to make a small fortune out of wine is to start off with a very large fortune.

allan-scott-wines-10005373 (1)

Scott is trying to reestablish a quality focus for Allan Scott Wines.

“It’s not a very profitable endeavor, to be honest, but it’s a bit like in France – it’s a lifestyle thing, tending the vines, picking grapes, making wine. Land prices in Marlborough have gone off the chart. There’s not much land left to convert to vineyard down here, so prices are going crazy. It might help in the long run, by weeding out some of the fly-by-night operators.”

So not content with making beer and making wine and all the other things he does in his busy life, he decided a couple of years back to complicate his life still further by entering the Cicerone program. Even worse, it meant he had to drink beer as part of his research.

“The Cicerone is quite a challenge. You need to know the history of beer, the different styles, you need to know about food matching, beer systems, everything about beer. I heard about the program and thought I’d give it a try. It’s been heaps of fun – I got to try thousands of different beers as research – and it’s given me a bit more credibility in the beer world.

“There are three levels, so the next stage for me is the Master Cicerone, which is like the Master of Wine for beer. You need an encyclopedic knowledge of beer and you face a two-day theory and practical exam. I would like to do the MW myself, but I need to nail this first.”

Holding the MW and MC qualifications would put him in a pretty singular group, but he has always been about combining his two major pursuits.

“We’ve experimented with a hopped Sauvignon Blanc and a Pinot Noir with chocolate and coffee flavors; we’re always looking to innovate and everyone is quite excited about it. We’re experimenting with aging our methode underwater and at altitude up on top of a mountain. I’ve been taking a leaf out of the brewing book and trying different things out in the winery.”

Craft Wine By Allan Scott Family Winemakers

craft wine

 

Looking for something a little more adventurous to choose from the wine list?

Spring clean your palate and say cheers to the new range of Craft Wine by Allan Scott Family Winemakers.

Created with the ingenuity and sense of adventure Kiwis are known for, Craft Wine by Allan Scott Family Winemakers is an exciting new craft keg project that celebrates experimentation and a sense of fun. Produced exclusively in kegs, and in limited batch lots, craft wine breaks the traditional winemaking mould and, through the use of brewery techniques, turns it on its head!

Challenge your sense of traditional Sauvignon Blanc and savour the unique hop punch delivered by the Gooseberry Bomb. This crafty drop boasts world-famous Sauvignon Blanc wine fermented with secret beer yeast, cleverly green hopped with Sauvin hops then lovingly nurtured in a craft keg.

Think you know all there is to know about Pinot? Phat Jam Pinot Noir will blow your predictions – and your palate! Rich, ripe Pinot Noir blends with fruity sweetness and gorgeous complexity, providing a delicious variety of flavours to tease and delight.

And add some spice to your Riesling repertoire with Razor’s Edge – Riesling at its most electric. Beautifully bold aromas of zesty lime and mandarin will tantalise your senses before they’re inundated with luscious flavour and sparked with a cunning bang of chilli.

Josh Scott says the new Craft Wine range aims to provide a unique experience for consumers.

Craft wine is made with the very different but unique mind-set of a craft brewer. From this, we have created an excitingly different drink that also maintains the high level of drinkability and product quality that a discerning, educated drinker expects

We are thrilled to have the opportunity to give Kiwi wine drinkers an innovative experience that challenges their traditional notions of which wines they enjoy – and what our new flavour combinations and crafting methods can offer them and their palate.”

Craft Wine by Allan Scott Family Winemakers is exclusive to the on-premise market.

 

Gooseberry BombGooseberry Bomb Razors Edge Riesling-01